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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:26 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

"I believe in the Bible. I believe that all good things come from God. I don't believe I'd sing the way I do if God hadn't wanted me to.' ”    
    
 
 
    
    
 
 
 
    
Meditation Garden Cam    
 
 

 


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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:26 pm    Post subject: Publicité

PublicitéSupprimer les publicités ?
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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:27 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

   
     
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   



 CLICK : Video at the Graceland Gates August 16 1977
 
/09/2012 12:09:57    
 
Dr. Jerry DeVane - Elvis experience starts ER career: DR. JERRY DEVANE, an emergency medicine physician at SkyRidge Medical Center in Cleveland, started his career by working on the King of Rock and Roll, Elvis Presley, in 1977. After working on thousands of patients throughout his 35 years as an ER physician, DeVane is still as dedicated to saving lives and taking care of patients as he was during his internship at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis. Most Elvis Presley fans, including Dr. Jerry DeVane, can remember where they were when “The King of Rock and Roll” died on Aug. 16, 1977.


 
DeVane will never forget where he was because he was at the side of Elvis Presley. As an intern at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, he did CPR on Elvis before he was pronounced dead by his physician, Dr. George Nichopolous.  
Looking back on that fateful day near the 35th anniversary of Elvis’ death, DeVane, the medical director of Bradley County Fire and Rescue and medical adviser to the Cleveland Fire Department, elaborated on the day that became a defining moment in his life and career as an emergency room physician.“I was working at the hospital that day as an acting intern on the resuscitation team when they called a code — which was a resuscitation in progress in the emergency room,” DeVane said. “Since I was on the resuscitation team I went into the emergency room that was packed with people. They were initiating the first steps of resuscitation. I made my way around the stretcher and relieved the person doing the chest compressions.”

DeVane said he did not know he was working on Elvis Presley, explaining, “When you go into resuscitation your mind goes into a series of steps that you have to take to give the person the best opportunity for survival. We were in those steps — not really thinking about outcome or who the person is, but thinking about getting things done as efficiently as possible.”

Still, looking down at the person and having grown up just two miles from Elvis’ house on Whitehaven, DeVane said it did cross his mind, “Man! This guy could be Elvis Presley.’”

“I kept looking and pumping on his chest,” he said. “Then I looked down and saw he had on his signature, trademark necklace, which had TCB and a lightning bolt emboldened on it. He gave that to friends and associates.”

As he kept performing CPR, DeVane said others in the packed room wanted to know who the man was he was working on and someone blurted out, “It’s Elvis Presley.”

Because he was slightly above the crowd perched on a stool while performing resuscitation, DeVane said he could see everyone in the room and noticed Elvis’ private-duty nurse across the way and his physician facing the foot of the stretcher. The emergency room and paramedic staff continued to work on Elvis for quite a while but to no avail. The King was gone. Dr. Nichopolous listed the official cause of death as cardiac arrhythmia. Silence followed. Reality was setting in for everyone. Elvis was officially dead.

“It’s one of those surreal moments in life that — when you look back it doesn’t seem real, but at the time it was very real,” DeVane said. “He still looked like Elvis would look in life, but paler, obviously.”

According to DeVane, Presley “was never defibrillated because he never developed any kind of a heart beat.” Since Presley was found at home and paramedics had worked on him there before transporting him to Baptist Memorial Hospital, DeVane estimates Presley was out at least an hour before he worked on him.

“It was quite an experience in life,” DeVane admits. “And as you find out in emergency medicine, life is full of experiences. When you look back you wonder how you made it through all of them.”

DeVane said he grew up a fan of Elvis, who had lived not far from him in the community, but Elvis was older and had a different circle of friends.

“He use to come out and play football at our high school football stadium at Whitehaven High School,” DeVane recalled. But memories of that charismatic youth who turned rock and roll on its heels and took music to a new level of excitement took a back seat to what had unfolded on Aug. 16, 1977.

DeVane admits, “It really was the beginning of a career in medicine that made me want to try to make an impact. It was like a first experience to see exactly what kind of influence my opportunities in medicine provided.”

Having completed a residency in internal medicine at the city of Memphis Hospital, he moved to Cleveland and have been here ever since working as the medical director at Bradley Memorial Hospital, the medical director at Bradley County EMS for 25 years and an emergency medicine physician at SkyRidge Medical Center.

Married 38 years to Jo Lee DeVane, a physician at Lee University’s clinic, the couple has three children, Ben, who has a Ph.D. in educational technology, Taylor, a commercial pilot at American Eagle and Brianna, a fifth-grade student at Tennessee Christian School.

Having 35 years of experience and practices as E.R. physician, even having been stabbed by a patient once, DeVane said he is honored to be in his profession and to work side-by-side with dedicated professionals who oftentimes risk their lives for the sake of others — a profession he links to his faith.

“I feel pretty strongly that if I had not had my Maker walking with me throughout my career in the ER, I wouldn’t have made it these 35 years,” he said. “But every time you pass these public servants it would be nice if people would stop and give them a pat on the back and thank them, because they risk their lives for relatively little in reward other than the fact that they made an impact on someone’s life.”

Cleveland Daily Bannerh - elvisinfonet.com



   
   
   
   
 
   
 

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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:28 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote




 



http://www.dailymotion.com/swf/video/x17stpi%5B/flash%5D]


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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:28 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

  
  
Elvis Presley´s Funeral on August 18, 1977 
 
The private funeral an Thursday was plain and simple. Pallbearers were longtime friends Lamar Fike, George Klein and Joe Esposito, guitarist Charlie Hodge, cousins Billy and Gene Smith, Beach Bays road manager Jerry Schilling, personal physician Dr. George Nichopoulos and record producer Felton Jarvis. About 200 persons crowded into and out of Elvis' music room at Graceland at two p.m. to hear remarks by Rex Humbard, the TV evangelist from Akron, Ohio; comedian Jack Kahane, who had opened shows for Elvis; and the Reverend C.W. Bradley, pastor of Memphis' Wooddale Church of Christ. Bradley gave the main eulogy. 
Then the caravan, led by a silver Cadillac followed by the white Cadillac hearse with Elvis' body and seventeen white Cadillac limousines, toiled its way past bystanders the two and a half miles to Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown. 
A short ceremony followed in the white marble mausoleum where Elvis was entombed at 4:24 p.m. in a sixcrypt family chamber. Elvis' manager, Colonel Tom Parker, sat outside an a police motorcycle far a while. Elvis' friends said the Colonel was not letting anyone know how he felt. (There was open speculation that Colonel Parker had earlier canceled his contract with Elvis. Road manager Joe Esposito said that was ridiculous: "I called the Colonel about that. He laughed and said, 'Where do these stories start?' The Colonel's plans are the same today as if Elvis were still here. They had a written contract.") 
Vernon Presley stayed with his son after everyone else left the mausoleum and emerged visibly shaken. 
Family and friends returned to Graceland for a Southern supper. Vernon Presley decided to give all the flowers to fans, and at 8:25 a.m. Friday the gates to Forest Hill were opened. By 11:30 the flowers were gone. 
Elvis' first producer, Sam Phillips of Sun Records fame, said he thought it was possible that Elvis died of a broken heart, since he could never find any true friends. Elvis' last producer, Felton Jarvis, said that maybe Elvis had a death wish and that it wasn't the fans who billed hint, it was the people around him. A young woman named Vicki said, "Hey, all you have to do is stand on any corner here in Whitehaven and you'll find people who've been to parties at his house. High-school girls got new cars from him. He hired a guy just to play racquet ball with him--that was his only job. Elvis always had someone carry his black hag with his 'credentials': that was all his police badges." 
After the funeral, after it was all over, the crowds continued to grow outside Graceland. One caravan of six cars arrived late Thursday. Wanda Magyor, thirty-three, of Latrobe, Pennsylvania, jiggled a baby on her hip as she told of her love for Elvis. "We'll stay out here all night just to get into the cemetery. We drove all night to get here. I will get a flower from the cemetery." 
One of her companions, Myrtle Smith said, "Thirty of us decided to come down here because there'll never be another one like him. He was the king of everyone and especially of our people. He was the king of the gypsies. He was ours." 
 
 
 
 
  
  
  
  
  
 
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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:28 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

Lisa Marie, Priscilla, Shirley Dieu 
and others 
Boarding the LisaMarie 
for Memphis 
 
 
 
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
The Day Elvis Presley Died
 
 
 


 
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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:29 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

  
  
  
Elvis photo destroyed, defendant say
Palm Beach Post Staff Writer  
Tuesday, June 24, 2008  
Elvis is still dead, and so is the famous photo of him laid out in his coffin, according to recently filed court papers.  
"The Elvis Photo was destroyed," say the attorneys representing a New York man who is accused of snatching the picture from the anthrax-tainted former headquarters of the National Enquirer.  
 






 
Further, they say, they have another photo to prove it.  
In a federal lawsuit filed last month, a Boca Raton developer who bought the tabloid's former headquarters is demanding a return of the photo, which he says is worth at least $1 million. In the lawsuit, developer David Rustine says the photo was stolen by John Y. Mason, head of a New York company hired to decontaminate the building in the wake of a 2001 anthrax attack.  
Late last week, Mason fired back.  
Not only is he saying he did not swipe the photo, he is suing Rustine for defamation of character for alleging he did.  
"Mr. Mason has never threatened to steal or otherwise withhold the Elvis Photo from Mr. Rustine," wrote Boca Raton attorneys Robert Hunt and Debra Klingsberg, who represent Mason.  
In fact, they say, the photo was destroyed when Mason's company, Sabre Technical Services, fumigated the building after it was infected with anthrax in 2001. The still-unsolved anthrax attack killed tabloid photo editor Bob Stevens.  
As evidence that the photo was destroyed, Mason's attorneys included a grainy picture of a man wearing a white hooded jumpsuit and a gas mask. The man, whom they identify as tabloid in-house counsel Daniel Rotstein, is holding the photo that produced a record 6.5 million sales for the Enquirer when it was on the cover of the tabloid shortly after Elvis Presley's August 1977 death.  
The picture of Rotstein was snapped shortly before the Elvis photo and hundreds of others were shredded, the attorneys contend. Rotstein, they say, oversaw the shredding.  
Officials at American Media Inc., which owns the Enquirer, the Star and other tabloids and magazines such as Men's Fitness, said they don't think the man in the blurry photo is Rotstein. But, they said, they don't understand the battle royal over the photo of "The King."  
Even if it exists, it's worth little, said Mike Antonello, an AMI attorney.  
The key isn't who owns the photo or even the negative, but who owns the copyright, he said.  
While Rustine may have inherited thousands of celebrity photos when he bought AMI's $10 million headquarters for $40,000 in 2003, he doesn't own the copyright on them, Antonello said.  
While Rustine can sell the photos, he can't publish them or whoever owns the copyright can sue, Antonello said.  
"If he tries to sell it for $1 million and he says the copyright goes with it, he would get sued," Antonello said.  
He said he didn't know who owns the copyright for the photo that a former Enquirer editor says was shot for the tabloid by one of Presley's many cousins. The tabloid paid the cousin $18,000 to snap the photo, former Editor Iain Calder revealed in a book he wrote about his years at the Enquirer.  
Antonello said he couldn't figure out what was fueling the lawsuit over what he described as "a non-issue."  
Neither Mason nor Rustine's attorneys returned telephone calls. However, in separate court claims, they blast each other over how the infamous photo has been used in their business dealings.  
In his lawsuit, Rustine says Mason took the photo hostage to keep him from canceling Sabre's contract. Mason contends that Rustine filed the lawsuit over the photo to force him to resolve a $10 million claim he filed against Rustine after the contract was canceled.  
Royce Emley, a former promotion manager for AMI, said the negative of the Presley photo — one of five shot of the dead rock-and-roll icon — was kept in a vault. He suspects top editors grabbed the negatives before they evacuated the building during the anthrax attack.  
"Can you think of an asset the National Enquirer had that was more valuable than the Elvis photo?" he asked. "I can't."  
  
 
  
 
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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:30 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

 
The casket was moved from its position in the entrance to the music room and placed in the foyer. It was lined up just inside the doorway to Graceland with the head of the casket pointing north. Preparations for the public viewing were now almost complete. This was to be the most trying of ordeals from a security standpoint. Sam and I had discussed the procedures over and over, trying to make sure we had covered all the bases.

Up until now, movements of Elvis's body had been unannounced and done with relative little publicity and completed in secret with plenty of escort for protection. Now, we were about to ask people to come close, to enter the confines of the estate and to approach close to the casket. Even under normal circumstances this would be a problem. Fans mobbed Elvis wherever he went but he loved every minute of it and he didn't want to ever lose that appeal or that respect. But things were not normal. Elvis was deceased and the fans were not there in the same fashion as before a concert. They were upset. They were hysterical in somce cases. They were not normal. Many had come from hudreds of miles away, some further. They were crying. They were sad. This was not to be a happy moment.

The showing of emotion under these circumstances was to be expected but we needed to be aware of the overly emotional person. That was to be expected also. We didn't want anyone throwing themselves onto the casket or disrupting the process for those who followed. Sam and I analyzed what needed to be done. We also felt that someone might want to take pictures which we did not wish to have happen. I was determined to not have his picture appear on the front page of some newspaper while he was laying in a coffin. That was my own personal failure out of this entire process. I rpotected Elvis from outsiders but thought that the "threat" would come from the inside from his own family. I quickly learned what a bunch of "turn coats" existed within the family.

Our first concern was to control the crowd. While they were all outside we had relative ease in controlling them. Once we opened the gates and invited them in, things could change. The crowd estimated by now to be approaching 100,000 was massive. Control could be very easily lost if it was allowed to slip for just one instance.

The "black and white" plan was set into motion. The front gate would be opened only wide enough to allow one person at a time to pass. The security detail on the gate would be "beefed" up, putting men on the pillars with speakers to announce the rules for entering. The men inside would channel those entering to the right side of the drive. Two barricades would be set outside the gate to channel those entering to come from the right side of the gate and allowing those leaving to exit to the left. This only worked partially especially after time began to run out for people to enter. Once inside they would be directed to pass up the drive along the right side by officers stationed along the way. Announcements would be made at the gate and just before making the turn toward the house that cameras would not be permitted and that they would be confiscated and the offenders ejected immediately. People were advised to leave their cameras outside, however they could leave them in the gate house but we were acceepting no responsibility. They were also advised that anyone getting off the drive onto the grass would be ejected. They were allowed to look at the flowers but to not touch.

As the line approached the house, another annoucement would be made showing that there would be no stopping on front of the casket. The line was allowed to walk up the front steps on the right side, walk past the front door and exit by the left side of the steps. A chain and stanchion type barrier was placed directly in front of the casket to prevent anyone from approaching closer than three feet. Once they had passed by the coffin they exited the estate by walking down the drive on the left side finally coming back to the front gate. There, entering people were stopped to allow those exiting to pass out the gates. The entire process we estimated would take a half hour from the time one entered until they left. We did not realize how close together the fans would stand in line as they made their way up to the house. At one point it took almost two hours to pass by the casket.

Vernon had originally said that he wanted to let the fans file by for two hours. This was the time we planned upon. Security was set on the casket itself. On either side of the door just outside the house were uniformed officers, one to each side. These officers were on the casket of the barrier set up. On the crowd side of the barrier stood two members of the Honor Guard, one to each side. Just inside the door were two other security people. Al Strada stood at the foot of the casket and Dean (Nichopolous) was at the head. Either man could move from his position tot he ouside area of the casket by taking one step. The United States flag and the Tennessee flag stood on stadards just outside the door. Four other members of the National Guard honor guard stood by the pillars at the top of the steps.

Thus I felt that no one could get to the casket. If anyone tried there were several "circles" of prevention and protection that would come into play. Al did not move from his position refusing any relief durring the entire time we allowed the public to pass. Al took this as a personal assignment and was not about to be denied for any reason. I believe that if we were still allowing fans to pass, he would still be standing there.

So the arrangements were set. Both Sam and I would be out front watching the crowd. All the officers were instructed to be watchful for anyone acting "crazy" or strange. Those individuals would be watched more closely as they approached the house. We reviewed the plans once more and could see no flaws that were apparent. We hoped and prayed it would work."

by Dick Grob Security Chief Graceland & On Tours

 
 
The whole question of this coffin picture has always bothered me. It never looked quite right and reading this whole thread lead me to crack open photoshop and do some tinkering.
First thing I did was look for an almost complete profile picture of Elvis, I found one (perhaps 1973 I think?)
I made it black and white and flipped it on its side and "closed" the eye. First "shock" Elvis does look very different from that angle. For one his second chin is more noticable than it is in normal photos.
Then I made it transparent and overlaid it on the NE picture, it matches exactly in: nose, mouth, chin, hairline. All features (according to experts) used in photo analysis as with the Lincoln photos.
The one obvious discrepancy was the eyebrow, the "smoulder" is gone. I know there are stories of plastic surgery around his eyes. Even without that brow muscles do respond differently post mortem.
I'm not drawing any huge conclusions from this, but my own doubts about that photo are now diminished.
 
 
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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:30 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote



  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 
  
 


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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:31 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Vernon Presley,  
Elvis Presley's father,  
places a rose  
on his son's grave Nov. 24, 1977, 
as newspeople were permitted inside 
the grounds at Graceland in Memphis, Tenn., 
for the first time since Elvis' funeral.  
 
 
 
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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:31 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

    
     

  

 
 
Til we meet you again, may God bless you,    
Adios.    
 
 
 
1977 Aug 29    
1977:   
Aug 29 - three men, Ronnie Lee Adkins (26), Raymond M. Green (25) and Bruce Nelson (20) were charged with attempting to steal Elvis' body from the mausoleum at Forrest Hills Cemetary. At first it was reported that they planned to ask $10m in ransom (see OCT 4).Oct 02 - Elvis and his mother were buried in the Meditation Garden at Graceland.Oct 04 - Charges were dropped in the case that resulted from the arrest on August 29 of three men in an apparent attempt to steal Elvis' body and hold it for $10 million ransom.
Authorities admitted that one of the men, Ronnie Adkins, was a police informant, and the whole plan may have been a hoax.
The trio continued to be charged with dismeanor trespassing.

Some other comments I read:





The charges against the three men who allegedly tried to swipe Presley's body were dropped by the Memphis prosecutor when the chief witness and accuser
(legalese for "rat"), one Ronnie Lee Adkins, demonstrated his unreliability by getting himself arrested for fraud. Adkins apparently had checked into Memphis's Doctor's Hospital posing as a policeman in order to claim that he was covered by the city's insurance plan.
So who was Ronnie Adkins - and if he was a police informant .. what's the story ?


From Dick Grob's : Elvis Conspiracy 



 
    
 
10/02/2009 5:06:04
Elvis photo's fate still a mystery: Lawsuit ends when all parties dismiss claims - The fate of the famous photo of Elvis in his coffin apparently will remain a mystery.A federal lawsuit in West Palm Beach over the photo valued at $1 million ended last week when all involved agreed to dismiss their claims.Such action typically means a settlement was reached, but attorneys representing the warring parties couldn't be reached for comment despite attempts by phone.
Questions about the photo were central to a lawsuit filed last year by Boca Raton developer David Rustine, who bought the anthrax-ravaged former headquarters of the National Enquirer. The tabloid set sales records when it published the photo shortly after Elvis Presley's 1977 death.


Rustine claimed John Mason, head of a New York company hired to clean the building, snatched it. Mason claimed the photo was destroyed when the building was fumigated and then countersued Rustine for defamation. (News, Source: Jane Musgrave | The Palm Beach Post, SunSentinel.com)




 


 
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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:32 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

  
 
G l a d y s F u n e r a l        
 
       
 
      
 
   
 
   
 
Set of Gladys funerals 12 pictures in large size        
  
   
   
Rare Photo: Gladys's Original Gravesite at Forest Hill
 
55 years ago today
 
Today in history... although the death of Gladys had a major impact on the life of her only son Elvis - THE superstar of the world 55 years ago - the news papers didn't pay too much attention to her passing away. This is just about the 'biggest' news paper article published on August 15th 1958. Elvis was devistated and stayed with his mother day and night.

Here's an interesting read from Memphis Magazine: "Digging through a box of dusty 35mm slides purchased at a Memphis estate sale, I found the usual stuff — family photos, shots of Christmas trees, lots of living rooms and kitchens, and lots and lots and LOTS of pictures of flowers in somebody's garden. And then I found this — a rare photo of Gladys Presley's original gravesite in Forest Hill Cemetery, taken in 1958, judging from the date scribbled on the slide mount.Most people vaguely familiar with the life of the King of Rock-and-Roll know that his beloved mother died while Elvis was stationed in Texas after being drafted into the Army. But after that, they're not so sure about things.Here's what happened. Gladys, in poor health for years, died of heart failure on August 14, 1958. She was just 46 years old. Elvis was given a short leave to return home and help his father, Vernon, with the funeral arrangements. After a service at Memphis Funeral Home on Union (since demolished), Glady was laid to rest in Forest Hill Cemetery, just up the road a bit from Graceland.For some reason, some Elvis biographers say she was buried just outside the entrance to the old mausoleum at Forest Hill, but that's wrong. Her original grave is at the top of a hill, in the older section of the cemetery. As you can see in the old photo, a very impressive white marble monument, adorned with an angel and cherubs, stood guard over the grave. I've never been able to find out much about this monument; one source said that members of Elvis' band bought it for him, but I don't know if that's true.Almost 20 years later, Elvis died at Graceland, on August 16, 1977. He was placed into a crypt in the Forest Hill Mausoleum, and Glady was disinterred and placed in the crypt just below his, in a gated room inside the mausoleum. So you see, Glady was actually buried at Forest Hill, and then later her body was placed in the mausoleum. About two weeks later, as most people remember, there was a botched attempt to steal Elvis' remains from the crypt — the exact motive for this has never been revealed — so city officials determined that the bodies of Elvis and his mother, in their matching copper coffins — would be moved to Graceland, where they rest today.And what about this imposing monument at Forest Hill? It was actually dismantled and moved to Graceland as well, where it stands just outside the Meditation Gardens. A spokesperson for the cemetery remembers when it was moved: "Oh yes, it was quite a job." If you go to Forest Hill today, and know just where to look, you can find the concrete slab for the Presley monument is still in place. In fact, here's a photo (below) I took last week, from the same vantage point as the original photographer. The dark slab in the foreground marks the site of the Presley monument. That stone building in the background — which isn't as gloomy-looking today as it seems in the old photo — is a private tomb for another family. 
And as for the girls in the photo? I have no idea. Does anybody recognize them?"
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
        
 
   
        
 
        
 
        
 
       
        
 
   
    
        
 
        
 
        
 
        
 





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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:32 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

10/03/2012 5:36:29
 
  
 
"The Elvis Cover-Up"......the "20/20" documentaries  
"The Elvis Cover-Up" was based on the book: The Death of Elvis What Really Happened*, Charles C. Thompson II & James P. Cole, Robert Hale, 1991, ISBN: 0709048033  
In 1979, "20/20", a popular news-magazine program on the ABC network in the USA, achieved its highest rating ever when it broadcast Geraldo Rivera's investigation into the death of Elvis Presley. Following the success of the program, "20/20" broadcast several follow-up segments in later editions. These included the Elvis Cover-Up #2; the indictment of Dr Nick, and The Legend Sells.Unseen for more than two decades, the "20/20" reports have assumed iconic status in discussions about Elvis' death.
 
Recently a DVD copy of the original hour long program and follow-up segments has been offered for sale and EIN was able to obtain a copy. On viewing the program(s) we were pleasantly surprised at what we found. In typical tabloid media style there are a number of glaring factual errors (Rivera stating near the beginning of the program that all of Elvis' 28 films were money makers being a good example of shoddy background research).
However, the central objective of the 20/20 investigation was to answer the question...what killed Elvis Presley?, crucially, what caused his heart to stop?
The documentary was produced by Charles C. Thompson, co-author of the book, "The Death of Elvis". It is from the Thompson and Cole book that the documentary essentially finds its narrative.
That narrative, based on a leaked copy of the toxicology report, concludes that Elvis had a medical (prescription medication) addiction and he died due to polypharmacy, an accidental overdose of the pain killer, Codeine, and nonbarbituate sedative, Quaalude.

Throughout the program (and in follow-up stories) Rivera makes no bones about who is one of the central culprits in the cover-up, Shelby County Medical Examiner, Dr Jerry Francisco. Francisco took it upon himself to call a press conference following the autopsy, to announce Elvis died from cardiac arrhythmia, a statement deliberately misleading and only true on a superficial level. As Rivera asks, yes Elvis' heart stopped beating, but the real question is what caused it to stop beating?Francisco's statement was a finding at apparent odds with the official autopsy findings carried out by Dr Eric Muirhead, chief pathologist at Baptist Memorial Hospital. Francisco was an observer during the autopsy but for whatever reason, seized the opportunity to quell media questions and suspicions with a prosaic explanation of how Elvis died.
Francisco would later make the outrageous claim that "Dr Nick's" indictment for prescribing thousands of pills to Elvis had nothing at all to do with his death! Francisco's arrogance is stunning - it is an amazing scene to watch.
Further, in his arguments to the media, Francisco stated that the amounts of drugs in Elvis' body were not sufficient to kill him. What Francisco deliberately omitted to add was that the letter he took that view from also included another sentence saying "categorically", that in combination, all the drugs present in Elvis' body could well have been lethal!
In true conspiracy fashion the viewer is told that:

  • the death scene was "cleaned up" by insiders at Graceland
  • "Dr Nick" was to collect Elvis' medications and provide them to the police (the latter never happening)
  • there was no formal police investigation into Elvis' death in August 1977
  • there was no Coroner's Inquest
  • there was no drug investigation
  • the contents of Elvis' stomach were destroyed without analysis
  • the hospital files concerning Elvis' death are missing
  • the police photos of the death scene and the toxicology reports are missing
  • there were/are "two" death certificates!
 
Elvis' alleged fiancee at the time of his death, Ginger Alden, features a number of times in the program(s). Contrary to many reports that she was an "out of her depth" young woman, she comes across as confident and lucid. Probably due to clever editing she states that in August 1977 Elvis' time had come, and adds "but there again in my mind there were a number of unanswered questions'' (the Elvis is alive believers will have a field day with this!). She also reveals the last words Elvis ever said.
Others to feature include a very hesitant and withdrawn "Dr Nick", Dr Max Shapiro (aka "Dr Feelgood"), Dr Elias Ghanem, private detective John O'Grady, W.S. Nash the pharmacist who filled the prescription for what would be the fatal dose, Marty Lacker, David and Ricky Stanley, Dee Presley, Vester Presley (talking about his book), Dr Jerry Francisco, and celebrity medical examiner, Cyril Wecht.
Private detective O'Grady voices his strong opinion on Elvis' death...negligent homicide!
DVD quality: The audio and video quality is generally good-very good, although as it was taped from TV there are annoying jumps and video imperfections between each program/segment.

The release viewed by EIN (see visuals) was region free, has a professional look and came with a picture disc. There is also a segment selection menu. Verdict: The deliberate mix of emotional tabloid journalism and seering toxicology evidence makes the "20/20" program(s) compelling, if at times, disturbing viewing. Regardless of your view on the merits of its conclusions (and many have disputed the conclusions), the program(s) have significant merit in questioning (exposing) the actions of "Dr Nick", Dr Jerry Francisco, and what appears to have been a 'Keystone Cops' approach to Elvis' death.
Not surprisingly, the Thompson & Cole book on which the program(s) were based, provides a much more detailed account and explanation of the subject.
What the "20/20" investigation does do persuasively, is establish that while there was/is a conspiracy, Elvis is indeed dead.
Availability: "The Elvis Cover-Up" (aka "The Death of Elvis What Really Happened") DVD has been found recently on eBay. Copies of the initial few "20/20" broadcasts have been listed, as has a copy of just the original one hour special.
Note: The "20/20" programs currently in circulation do not include the Geraldo Rivera special in April 1985 where singer David Darlock admitted he was the voice behind alleged Elvis song recordings released by Steven Chanzes, and later by Major Bill Smith.

 
 
 
  
 
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PostPosted: December 9th 2012, 07:33 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

 
 
 
24/07/2010 5:34:42
Alleged Elvis embalming tools removed from auction:
An array of surgical and other instruments allegedly used in the 1977 embalming of Elvis Presley was withdrawn Thursday from a planned auction after Memphis Funeral Home objected to the auction of property taken without the funeral home's consent.
Funeral home president E.C. Daves said the instruments were taken by an embalmer who kept them for more than 30 years before offering them for sale through Leslie Hindman Auctioneers in Chicago. The auction is scheduled Aug. 12 and the Elvis items were in two lots valued by the auction house at $8,000 and $6,000.
Daves said the authenticity of the items still is in question. He said the retired embalmer, in his 80s, claimed to have taken the items after Presley's embalming the night of Aug. 16, 1977. But Daves said another employee told him that those instruments had been sterilized and were used again.
"There's no way to tell whether (the auction items) are authentic," he said.
Daves said the retired embalmer and his son, who handled negotiations with the auction house, agreed to withdraw the items. He said the funeral home plans no legal reprisals if the items are returned.
Auction house owner Leslie Hindman was less final. In an e-mail, she said, "We are in discussions with all parties."
Daves said the funeral home is awaiting word from the Elvis Presley estate on its preferences. The items could be donated to a funeral history museum in Houston.
"Or we could destroy them," Daves said. "We're not going to do anything until the Presley estate agrees with it."
A Graceland spokesman declined to comment. (News, Source: Michael Lollar, The Commercial Appeal)


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
On Monday, August 15th, Elvis arose late, as was his custom. (The Memphis Commercial Appeal's editorial on his passing noted that "if he kept late hours, he also kept the peace."(After nightfall, he took one of his Stutz-Bearcats out for a drive through Memphis. After returning to Graceland he went to his racquet ball court and played until about six a.m. Tuesday, August 16th.
At 2:33 p.m. the call came to the Memphis Fire Department's Engine House No. 29 on 2147 Elvis Presley Boulevard. The call, from Elvis' road manager Joe Esposito, said that someone was having trouble breathing at Graceland. That is not an unusual complaint, since fans often faint outside the Presley mansion. Charlie Crosby and Ulysses S. Jones Jr. jumped into Unit No. 6, a "Modular Rev Ambulance" -- an orange and white boxlike structure affixed to a GMC chassis--turned on the siren and headed south. At 3746 Elvis Presley Boulevard (no one here calls it just Presley or just Elvis) the ambulance was led up the winding driveway of Graceland by a waiting car.
Crosby and Jones were brought upstairs, where Presley was lying on the floor of his bathroom. His personal doctor. George Nichopoulos was administering cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
They put Elvis, in his blue pajamas, into Unit No. 6 and sped north on Elvis Presley Boulevard. Crosby was driving and Jones was helping with revival attempts in the back. A number of Elvis' employees followed. They turned left on Union and raced to Baptist Memorial Hospital's emergency room entrance, just four-tenths of a mile east of the original Sun Records studio at 706 Union -- now a vacant and padlocked yellow, one-story building -- where Elvis first recorded. "Breathe, Presley, breathe!" the Commercial Appeal quoted his doctor as saying on the way to the hospital. It was more than too late. Presley's body was already blue.
Even so, at 2:56 p.m. he was rushed into the emergency room, which was then closed to all other cases. A "Harvey Team," which is trained in all means of reviving a dying person, worked on him without success. Dr. Nichopoulos finally pronounced Elvis Presley dead at 3:30 p.m.
His body, which was becoming bloated, was moved to the hospital morgue on the second floor. The morgue was sealed off by tight security and the preliminary autopsy began, with every important doctor in the hospital present. Also called in was Dr. Jerry Francisco, the Shelby County medical examiner. Their preliminary ruling was cardiac arrhythmia and hardening of the arteries.
"Elvis had the arteries of an eighty-year-old man," a Baptist Hospital employee said. "His body was just worn out. His arteries and veins were terribly corroded."
"He had been hospitalized here on five occasions," the employee said. "Usually, he would go home to Graceland first. But the last time, in April, they flew him directly here from Louisiana. Every time, the security got tighter. This time, when he was dead, it was tight.
"An autopsy usually takes twenty-four hours. Usually, any vital organs that are removed for study are returned and put into a bag and dropped into the coffin before burial. But not in Elvis' case. His brain, his heart, his liver, his kidneys and all the rest have been kept out for tests here." (Maurice Elliott, Baptist Hospital's vice-president, said, "All organs were removed, and that is not unusual." Elliott added that "we don't have a definite cause of death yet, and as the coroner, Dr. [Jerry] Francisco said, we may never know the exact cause of death. Since Dr. Francisco ruled death by natural causes, it then became a private case. So, all autopsy findings will be referred to the family and then any public announcement of the results will be up to the family.")
"He was hospitalized here from April 1st to 6th of this year, after cutting short a tour. And Elvis was here for two weeks in January and February of '75, for two weeks in August and September of '75, for two weeks in October of '73, the hospital employee said. "They were treating him for everything -- hypertension, enlarged colon, gastroenteritis stomach inflammation. He was getting cortisone treatments, and I heard that was for arthritis, but our doctor said Elvis might have had systemic lupus erythematosus. Lupus is an extremely rare, chronic inflammation of the nervous systems kidneys and skin. It is treated with cortisone. He also had a severe liver condition. Cortisone might have explained his weight -- he was a big man; he was weighing at least 230 pounds."
Doctors at Baptist Memorial discounted the lupus theory and said final autopsy results may not be known for weeks.
Elvis' body was removed by hearse from Baptist Memorial at 8:10 p.m. and taken up Union to the Memphis Funeral Home for embalming. The nest morning he was taken to the foyer of Graceland to lie in state.
Almost immediately after his death was announced at four p.m. on Tuesday, mourners began gathering outside Graceland, a surprisingly modest, eighteen-room former church that Elvis bought for his mother in 1957.
To reach Graceland you head south on Elvis Presley Boulevard, that portion of Bellevue which was renamed after Memphis' favorite son in 1972, and pass through a steadily deteriorating neighborhood past Forest Hill Cemetery Midtown where his mother, Gladys Smith Presley, was buried in 1958, also at the age of forty-two, past Denny's Restaurant, past an open field of eleven acres that Elvis owns, and there, at 3746, is a low, rock fence with a jagged top, a white iron gate and a red brick gatehouse to guard Elvis' privacy.
Elvis' father, Vernon, had decided to let the mourners file past the open casket in Graceland from three to five p.m. on Wednesday, and the crush of humanity out on Elvis Presley Boulevard had become fearsome. Literally miles of mourners stretched in both directions, waiting for a last glimpse. Is was as comprehensive a cross section of America as one could ever wish to see: bikers, businessmen, children, Shriners in clown shirts and phalanxes of middle-aged women, many of them sobbing.
The grounds of Graceland Christian Church, which is Elvis' neighbor on the north (on the south is the podiatry clinic), were soon littered with soft-drink cans and film wrappers. The church's trees were snapping under the weight of people trying to see beyond the rock fence. And the shopping center across the street from Graceland quickly overflowed with cars and people and souvenir vendors. A woman leaned against she signpost for "Mr. Toy of America" and openly sobbed as she listened to "Love Me Tender" coming from a nearby car radio.
Inside the grounds, once you got past the press compound and the roped off medical area, the pastoral quiet was stunning. At the top of the circular sloping driveway there were more flowers than one could count: dozens of floral guitars and hound dogs and hearts. Eventually, a hundred vans decreed 3166 floral arrangements sent by everyone from the Soviet Union to Elton John to the Memphis Police Department.
Graceland is an understated, two-story white brick colonial building. Two massive, white stone lions flank the doorway. Behind them Air National Guardsmen stood at stiff attention. Just inside the foyer, Elvis was laid out in a 900-pound copper-lined coffin underneath a crystal chandelier. White linen was spread on the floor and grim, silent bodyguards were fanned out around the room. Elvis was dressed is a pure white suit, light blue shirt and white tie. The face was riveting: terribly pale and puffy but still handsome. The woman just in front of me in line, when she saw that face, sagged visibly as though she has just taken a bullet. Her sobs were the only sounds in the room.
In the midst of the plainness and glory of death, kids were skateboarding right beside a crying girl who was clutching at least twenty-five copies of the Press-Scimitar with its headline: A LONELY LIFE ENDS ON ELVIS PE5LEY BOULEVARD. Other kids were scouting she parking lot with shopping bags, looking for returnable soft-drink bottles.
At fine p.m. a gentle rain began but no one was about to leave. The gates were to close then, but the police had to deal with about 10,000 people. Finally the order can't from "the family": she gates would be shut at 6:30. They were. In seemed touch-and-go for a while--an awesome crowd surged at the gates amid boos and tears and sobs. Eventually, the crowd gave up. The rock wall facing on Elvis Presley Boulevard is low enough to jump over but no one tried.
The last people in line were Mike and Cheryl Smelser, of Memphis. How did it feel to be last in line? "Right now it does not feel all that good," said Mike.
The crowds outside Graceland did not let up. In the early morning hours of Thursday, August 18th, the first two Elvis Presley-related fatalities occurred. At four a.m., Alice Hovatar and Juanita Johnson, both from Monroe, Louisiana, and Tammy Baiter of St. Clair, Missouri, went out to the median strip of Elvis Presley Boulevard to talk to Officer W. C. Greenwood. Alice said to him, "I can't believe he's dead." Then, according so witnesses a 1963 white Ford driven by a man identified as Treatise Wheeler, eighteen, headed south slowly and did a sudden U-turn in the shopping center parking lot in front of the Hickory Log. Tires smoking, the Ford headed north straight far the median strip, at 50 mph. Officer Greenwood threw his flashlight at the windshield bar is was too late.
The car hit the three girls and tossed them like matchsticks. Johnson and Hovatar, their bodies mangled beyond recognition, died instantly. Baiter remains in critical condition. Officers immediately arrested Wheeler.
Wheeler appeared in court on Friday and, after his mother said that he had mental problems, was held without bail.
About the same time, 1700 copies of the Commercial-Appeal were stolen and were being hawked at prices ranging up to five dollars.








 
 
 

 



 
 
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PostPosted: February 19th 2013, 08:25 pm    Post subject: Funerals Reply with quote

 

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